Sewin' With Sass
Hi! Welcome to my page! My name is Caitlin and I'm a costume designer and seamstress for hire! Here, I'll post images of my work! If you're interested in a design or costume creation, check out my website: adaria-designs.com
Sewin' With Sass
+
samhawke:

How To Turn Craft Foam Into Leather
(Or not really but close enough. Also a side order of armour.)I picked up this technique from this tutorial years ago, then adapted it further. You can use it to imitate leather, and with a few changes also to make thin armour parts, such as Vincent Valentine’s gauntlet as in the last picture. It won’t really work for thicker armour; there are plenty of tutorials on how to make EVA foam armour to be found online.Back to fakey leather; you need the standard 2mm craft foam/fun foam/EVA foam/foam of many names, white glue, a brush, shoe polish, mod podge/podgy glue and a sponge.You want to have most of the shaping and decorating done before you start. For example, for Athos’ pauldron I had already glued the three layers of the main piece and the fleur de lis shield together (UHU glue works well, all purpose glue is also okay), but had left the two upper strips and the straps separate to be attached after everything was done. It is also easiest to do any embossing when the pieces are still flat. Foam won’t take an awful lot of detail, but with some patience the results can work quite well. You can use paper embossing tools for this, but make sure that the point isn’t too sharp or it will tear the foam. The back of a knife also works. My favourite tool for it so far is actually a letter opener. Drag across the foam for the first shallow line (it will spring back a bit) and repeat as many times as necessary without cutting the foam.One layer of craft foam isn’t very strong by itself, so you either want to have at least two layers glued together or a single layer backed with fabric. If the final result includes stitching, definitely attach fabric or the thread may pull right through the foam. Cover the back of the foam piece with white glue, then smooth fabric onto it. Use cotton or linen (not synthetics), so that the glue can come through the fabric. When it is dry, cut the fabric along the edges of the foam, then brush another layer of white glue on the fabric. This makes sure that the fabric is firmly stuck and that the edges won’t fray. (If you want to imitate metal armour, dilute the white glue a bit with water for the first couple of layers covering the whole piece; the fabric backing as well as the front and sides of the foam. This allows the glue to saturate the foam. Follow that with a few layers of undiluted glue, letting it dry in between layers until it’s stiff enough. The end result can be spray painted.)Most importantly, when you glue layers of foam or foam and fabric together make sure that it dries in the shape it’s supposed to be. For Athos’ vambrace I wrapped a towel around a bottle to have something roughly the shape of my upper arm and then tied the pauldron around it while the glue between the layers was drying. Once it is dry, it will hold its shape. You do not need to heat the foam to do this! Heating it is inadvisable since foam is somewhat toxic. Foam is also a little stretchy, so you can carefully stretch it for an extra curve. Glueing fabric to it will help it hold its shape.This is the point where I added battle damage to Athos’ pauldron by cutting grooves out of the top layer of foam with a stanley knife. The knife needs to be very sharp to prevent ragged edges, so use a new blade.Now for actually making it look like leather! Rub several layers of shoe polish onto the foam, letting it dry between layers. The resulting colour depends on the colour of the foam and the polish. Use black foam and brown polish for dark brown ‘leather’, white or grey foam for lighter shades and so on (the Gondorian vambrace in the picture before last was made using white foam for the top layer and black foam for the bottom layer). Then use a sponge to brush a layer of mod podge onto it. Mod podge is a glue varnish used for decoupage and is water resistant when it is dry. Two or three layers will do, and for a smooth finish dilute the mod podge with a little water for the last layer. Leave it to dry thoroughly. It will remain a little tacky, which can be solved by smoothing a little talcum powder onto the surface carefully. This also removes a bit of the shine, for a slightly more worn look.Finally, assemble the piece, sew the bits that have to be sewn, paint decoration etc. As a general tip, if you want to make an object that looks like leather, treat it like leather! Add stitching, add metal grommets and so on. That goes a long way in making it look convincing.
samhawke:

How To Turn Craft Foam Into Leather
(Or not really but close enough. Also a side order of armour.)I picked up this technique from this tutorial years ago, then adapted it further. You can use it to imitate leather, and with a few changes also to make thin armour parts, such as Vincent Valentine’s gauntlet as in the last picture. It won’t really work for thicker armour; there are plenty of tutorials on how to make EVA foam armour to be found online.Back to fakey leather; you need the standard 2mm craft foam/fun foam/EVA foam/foam of many names, white glue, a brush, shoe polish, mod podge/podgy glue and a sponge.You want to have most of the shaping and decorating done before you start. For example, for Athos’ pauldron I had already glued the three layers of the main piece and the fleur de lis shield together (UHU glue works well, all purpose glue is also okay), but had left the two upper strips and the straps separate to be attached after everything was done. It is also easiest to do any embossing when the pieces are still flat. Foam won’t take an awful lot of detail, but with some patience the results can work quite well. You can use paper embossing tools for this, but make sure that the point isn’t too sharp or it will tear the foam. The back of a knife also works. My favourite tool for it so far is actually a letter opener. Drag across the foam for the first shallow line (it will spring back a bit) and repeat as many times as necessary without cutting the foam.One layer of craft foam isn’t very strong by itself, so you either want to have at least two layers glued together or a single layer backed with fabric. If the final result includes stitching, definitely attach fabric or the thread may pull right through the foam. Cover the back of the foam piece with white glue, then smooth fabric onto it. Use cotton or linen (not synthetics), so that the glue can come through the fabric. When it is dry, cut the fabric along the edges of the foam, then brush another layer of white glue on the fabric. This makes sure that the fabric is firmly stuck and that the edges won’t fray. (If you want to imitate metal armour, dilute the white glue a bit with water for the first couple of layers covering the whole piece; the fabric backing as well as the front and sides of the foam. This allows the glue to saturate the foam. Follow that with a few layers of undiluted glue, letting it dry in between layers until it’s stiff enough. The end result can be spray painted.)Most importantly, when you glue layers of foam or foam and fabric together make sure that it dries in the shape it’s supposed to be. For Athos’ vambrace I wrapped a towel around a bottle to have something roughly the shape of my upper arm and then tied the pauldron around it while the glue between the layers was drying. Once it is dry, it will hold its shape. You do not need to heat the foam to do this! Heating it is inadvisable since foam is somewhat toxic. Foam is also a little stretchy, so you can carefully stretch it for an extra curve. Glueing fabric to it will help it hold its shape.This is the point where I added battle damage to Athos’ pauldron by cutting grooves out of the top layer of foam with a stanley knife. The knife needs to be very sharp to prevent ragged edges, so use a new blade.Now for actually making it look like leather! Rub several layers of shoe polish onto the foam, letting it dry between layers. The resulting colour depends on the colour of the foam and the polish. Use black foam and brown polish for dark brown ‘leather’, white or grey foam for lighter shades and so on (the Gondorian vambrace in the picture before last was made using white foam for the top layer and black foam for the bottom layer). Then use a sponge to brush a layer of mod podge onto it. Mod podge is a glue varnish used for decoupage and is water resistant when it is dry. Two or three layers will do, and for a smooth finish dilute the mod podge with a little water for the last layer. Leave it to dry thoroughly. It will remain a little tacky, which can be solved by smoothing a little talcum powder onto the surface carefully. This also removes a bit of the shine, for a slightly more worn look.Finally, assemble the piece, sew the bits that have to be sewn, paint decoration etc. As a general tip, if you want to make an object that looks like leather, treat it like leather! Add stitching, add metal grommets and so on. That goes a long way in making it look convincing.
samhawke:

How To Turn Craft Foam Into Leather
(Or not really but close enough. Also a side order of armour.)I picked up this technique from this tutorial years ago, then adapted it further. You can use it to imitate leather, and with a few changes also to make thin armour parts, such as Vincent Valentine’s gauntlet as in the last picture. It won’t really work for thicker armour; there are plenty of tutorials on how to make EVA foam armour to be found online.Back to fakey leather; you need the standard 2mm craft foam/fun foam/EVA foam/foam of many names, white glue, a brush, shoe polish, mod podge/podgy glue and a sponge.You want to have most of the shaping and decorating done before you start. For example, for Athos’ pauldron I had already glued the three layers of the main piece and the fleur de lis shield together (UHU glue works well, all purpose glue is also okay), but had left the two upper strips and the straps separate to be attached after everything was done. It is also easiest to do any embossing when the pieces are still flat. Foam won’t take an awful lot of detail, but with some patience the results can work quite well. You can use paper embossing tools for this, but make sure that the point isn’t too sharp or it will tear the foam. The back of a knife also works. My favourite tool for it so far is actually a letter opener. Drag across the foam for the first shallow line (it will spring back a bit) and repeat as many times as necessary without cutting the foam.One layer of craft foam isn’t very strong by itself, so you either want to have at least two layers glued together or a single layer backed with fabric. If the final result includes stitching, definitely attach fabric or the thread may pull right through the foam. Cover the back of the foam piece with white glue, then smooth fabric onto it. Use cotton or linen (not synthetics), so that the glue can come through the fabric. When it is dry, cut the fabric along the edges of the foam, then brush another layer of white glue on the fabric. This makes sure that the fabric is firmly stuck and that the edges won’t fray. (If you want to imitate metal armour, dilute the white glue a bit with water for the first couple of layers covering the whole piece; the fabric backing as well as the front and sides of the foam. This allows the glue to saturate the foam. Follow that with a few layers of undiluted glue, letting it dry in between layers until it’s stiff enough. The end result can be spray painted.)Most importantly, when you glue layers of foam or foam and fabric together make sure that it dries in the shape it’s supposed to be. For Athos’ vambrace I wrapped a towel around a bottle to have something roughly the shape of my upper arm and then tied the pauldron around it while the glue between the layers was drying. Once it is dry, it will hold its shape. You do not need to heat the foam to do this! Heating it is inadvisable since foam is somewhat toxic. Foam is also a little stretchy, so you can carefully stretch it for an extra curve. Glueing fabric to it will help it hold its shape.This is the point where I added battle damage to Athos’ pauldron by cutting grooves out of the top layer of foam with a stanley knife. The knife needs to be very sharp to prevent ragged edges, so use a new blade.Now for actually making it look like leather! Rub several layers of shoe polish onto the foam, letting it dry between layers. The resulting colour depends on the colour of the foam and the polish. Use black foam and brown polish for dark brown ‘leather’, white or grey foam for lighter shades and so on (the Gondorian vambrace in the picture before last was made using white foam for the top layer and black foam for the bottom layer). Then use a sponge to brush a layer of mod podge onto it. Mod podge is a glue varnish used for decoupage and is water resistant when it is dry. Two or three layers will do, and for a smooth finish dilute the mod podge with a little water for the last layer. Leave it to dry thoroughly. It will remain a little tacky, which can be solved by smoothing a little talcum powder onto the surface carefully. This also removes a bit of the shine, for a slightly more worn look.Finally, assemble the piece, sew the bits that have to be sewn, paint decoration etc. As a general tip, if you want to make an object that looks like leather, treat it like leather! Add stitching, add metal grommets and so on. That goes a long way in making it look convincing.
samhawke:

How To Turn Craft Foam Into Leather
(Or not really but close enough. Also a side order of armour.)I picked up this technique from this tutorial years ago, then adapted it further. You can use it to imitate leather, and with a few changes also to make thin armour parts, such as Vincent Valentine’s gauntlet as in the last picture. It won’t really work for thicker armour; there are plenty of tutorials on how to make EVA foam armour to be found online.Back to fakey leather; you need the standard 2mm craft foam/fun foam/EVA foam/foam of many names, white glue, a brush, shoe polish, mod podge/podgy glue and a sponge.You want to have most of the shaping and decorating done before you start. For example, for Athos’ pauldron I had already glued the three layers of the main piece and the fleur de lis shield together (UHU glue works well, all purpose glue is also okay), but had left the two upper strips and the straps separate to be attached after everything was done. It is also easiest to do any embossing when the pieces are still flat. Foam won’t take an awful lot of detail, but with some patience the results can work quite well. You can use paper embossing tools for this, but make sure that the point isn’t too sharp or it will tear the foam. The back of a knife also works. My favourite tool for it so far is actually a letter opener. Drag across the foam for the first shallow line (it will spring back a bit) and repeat as many times as necessary without cutting the foam.One layer of craft foam isn’t very strong by itself, so you either want to have at least two layers glued together or a single layer backed with fabric. If the final result includes stitching, definitely attach fabric or the thread may pull right through the foam. Cover the back of the foam piece with white glue, then smooth fabric onto it. Use cotton or linen (not synthetics), so that the glue can come through the fabric. When it is dry, cut the fabric along the edges of the foam, then brush another layer of white glue on the fabric. This makes sure that the fabric is firmly stuck and that the edges won’t fray. (If you want to imitate metal armour, dilute the white glue a bit with water for the first couple of layers covering the whole piece; the fabric backing as well as the front and sides of the foam. This allows the glue to saturate the foam. Follow that with a few layers of undiluted glue, letting it dry in between layers until it’s stiff enough. The end result can be spray painted.)Most importantly, when you glue layers of foam or foam and fabric together make sure that it dries in the shape it’s supposed to be. For Athos’ vambrace I wrapped a towel around a bottle to have something roughly the shape of my upper arm and then tied the pauldron around it while the glue between the layers was drying. Once it is dry, it will hold its shape. You do not need to heat the foam to do this! Heating it is inadvisable since foam is somewhat toxic. Foam is also a little stretchy, so you can carefully stretch it for an extra curve. Glueing fabric to it will help it hold its shape.This is the point where I added battle damage to Athos’ pauldron by cutting grooves out of the top layer of foam with a stanley knife. The knife needs to be very sharp to prevent ragged edges, so use a new blade.Now for actually making it look like leather! Rub several layers of shoe polish onto the foam, letting it dry between layers. The resulting colour depends on the colour of the foam and the polish. Use black foam and brown polish for dark brown ‘leather’, white or grey foam for lighter shades and so on (the Gondorian vambrace in the picture before last was made using white foam for the top layer and black foam for the bottom layer). Then use a sponge to brush a layer of mod podge onto it. Mod podge is a glue varnish used for decoupage and is water resistant when it is dry. Two or three layers will do, and for a smooth finish dilute the mod podge with a little water for the last layer. Leave it to dry thoroughly. It will remain a little tacky, which can be solved by smoothing a little talcum powder onto the surface carefully. This also removes a bit of the shine, for a slightly more worn look.Finally, assemble the piece, sew the bits that have to be sewn, paint decoration etc. As a general tip, if you want to make an object that looks like leather, treat it like leather! Add stitching, add metal grommets and so on. That goes a long way in making it look convincing.
samhawke:

How To Turn Craft Foam Into Leather
(Or not really but close enough. Also a side order of armour.)I picked up this technique from this tutorial years ago, then adapted it further. You can use it to imitate leather, and with a few changes also to make thin armour parts, such as Vincent Valentine’s gauntlet as in the last picture. It won’t really work for thicker armour; there are plenty of tutorials on how to make EVA foam armour to be found online.Back to fakey leather; you need the standard 2mm craft foam/fun foam/EVA foam/foam of many names, white glue, a brush, shoe polish, mod podge/podgy glue and a sponge.You want to have most of the shaping and decorating done before you start. For example, for Athos’ pauldron I had already glued the three layers of the main piece and the fleur de lis shield together (UHU glue works well, all purpose glue is also okay), but had left the two upper strips and the straps separate to be attached after everything was done. It is also easiest to do any embossing when the pieces are still flat. Foam won’t take an awful lot of detail, but with some patience the results can work quite well. You can use paper embossing tools for this, but make sure that the point isn’t too sharp or it will tear the foam. The back of a knife also works. My favourite tool for it so far is actually a letter opener. Drag across the foam for the first shallow line (it will spring back a bit) and repeat as many times as necessary without cutting the foam.One layer of craft foam isn’t very strong by itself, so you either want to have at least two layers glued together or a single layer backed with fabric. If the final result includes stitching, definitely attach fabric or the thread may pull right through the foam. Cover the back of the foam piece with white glue, then smooth fabric onto it. Use cotton or linen (not synthetics), so that the glue can come through the fabric. When it is dry, cut the fabric along the edges of the foam, then brush another layer of white glue on the fabric. This makes sure that the fabric is firmly stuck and that the edges won’t fray. (If you want to imitate metal armour, dilute the white glue a bit with water for the first couple of layers covering the whole piece; the fabric backing as well as the front and sides of the foam. This allows the glue to saturate the foam. Follow that with a few layers of undiluted glue, letting it dry in between layers until it’s stiff enough. The end result can be spray painted.)Most importantly, when you glue layers of foam or foam and fabric together make sure that it dries in the shape it’s supposed to be. For Athos’ vambrace I wrapped a towel around a bottle to have something roughly the shape of my upper arm and then tied the pauldron around it while the glue between the layers was drying. Once it is dry, it will hold its shape. You do not need to heat the foam to do this! Heating it is inadvisable since foam is somewhat toxic. Foam is also a little stretchy, so you can carefully stretch it for an extra curve. Glueing fabric to it will help it hold its shape.This is the point where I added battle damage to Athos’ pauldron by cutting grooves out of the top layer of foam with a stanley knife. The knife needs to be very sharp to prevent ragged edges, so use a new blade.Now for actually making it look like leather! Rub several layers of shoe polish onto the foam, letting it dry between layers. The resulting colour depends on the colour of the foam and the polish. Use black foam and brown polish for dark brown ‘leather’, white or grey foam for lighter shades and so on (the Gondorian vambrace in the picture before last was made using white foam for the top layer and black foam for the bottom layer). Then use a sponge to brush a layer of mod podge onto it. Mod podge is a glue varnish used for decoupage and is water resistant when it is dry. Two or three layers will do, and for a smooth finish dilute the mod podge with a little water for the last layer. Leave it to dry thoroughly. It will remain a little tacky, which can be solved by smoothing a little talcum powder onto the surface carefully. This also removes a bit of the shine, for a slightly more worn look.Finally, assemble the piece, sew the bits that have to be sewn, paint decoration etc. As a general tip, if you want to make an object that looks like leather, treat it like leather! Add stitching, add metal grommets and so on. That goes a long way in making it look convincing.
+
cosplayingwhileblack:

Character: Senketsu Kisaragi! Matoi Ryuko 
Series: Kill la Kill
SUBMISSION

Reblogging because this is probably one of the most awesome, daring, badass costumes I have seen in a very long time and this girl needs the recognition for all that hard work! I haven’t even seen KLK (I know, I know, I’m working on it) but I know the madness and this is top shelf.
You go girl!
Why Magical Girls Are Never Attacked During A Tranformation
+
Gyarados Ginjika WIP
Skirt fitting

Oh my gosh, ya’ll! This costume is literally a (sea) monster but I am so in love! Still plenty to do but the skirt is fit for now! The back is not complete as I had to jimmy the scales around the seam. Still, I couldn’t not show you guys!
Gyarados Ginjika WIP
Skirt fitting

Oh my gosh, ya’ll! This costume is literally a (sea) monster but I am so in love! Still plenty to do but the skirt is fit for now! The back is not complete as I had to jimmy the scales around the seam. Still, I couldn’t not show you guys!
Gyarados Ginjika WIP
Skirt fitting

Oh my gosh, ya’ll! This costume is literally a (sea) monster but I am so in love! Still plenty to do but the skirt is fit for now! The back is not complete as I had to jimmy the scales around the seam. Still, I couldn’t not show you guys!
+
Attention to all new cosplayers!
+
Gyarados Ginjika WIP Back detail and the beginnings of the skirt.
Frankly, the skirt is daunting as going up against the Elite Four with an empty potions bag.

You can see more photos of this and my previous work, as well as hilarious “behind the scenes” of me being a goober at my Facebook fanpage: Adaria Designs Cosplay Commissions!
Gyarados Ginjika WIP Back detail and the beginnings of the skirt.
Frankly, the skirt is daunting as going up against the Elite Four with an empty potions bag.

You can see more photos of this and my previous work, as well as hilarious “behind the scenes” of me being a goober at my Facebook fanpage: Adaria Designs Cosplay Commissions!
Gyarados Ginjika WIP Back detail and the beginnings of the skirt.
Frankly, the skirt is daunting as going up against the Elite Four with an empty potions bag.

You can see more photos of this and my previous work, as well as hilarious “behind the scenes” of me being a goober at my Facebook fanpage: Adaria Designs Cosplay Commissions!
+
Gyarados WIP Necklace & Shawl
Honestly, my iPhone photographs are not doing this fabric any justice. I cannot wait to get a real photoshoot done of this baby.

You can see more photos of this and my previous work, as well as hilarious “behind the scenes” of me being a goober at my Facebook fanpage: Adaria Designs Cosplay Commissions!
Gyarados WIP Necklace & Shawl
Honestly, my iPhone photographs are not doing this fabric any justice. I cannot wait to get a real photoshoot done of this baby.

You can see more photos of this and my previous work, as well as hilarious “behind the scenes” of me being a goober at my Facebook fanpage: Adaria Designs Cosplay Commissions!
Gyarados WIP Necklace & Shawl
Honestly, my iPhone photographs are not doing this fabric any justice. I cannot wait to get a real photoshoot done of this baby.

You can see more photos of this and my previous work, as well as hilarious “behind the scenes” of me being a goober at my Facebook fanpage: Adaria Designs Cosplay Commissions!
Gyarados WIP Necklace & Shawl
Honestly, my iPhone photographs are not doing this fabric any justice. I cannot wait to get a real photoshoot done of this baby.

You can see more photos of this and my previous work, as well as hilarious “behind the scenes” of me being a goober at my Facebook fanpage: Adaria Designs Cosplay Commissions!
+
Gyarados WIP Get your trim on! Found some old gold trim in Jenny’s trim bin! It’s absolutely perfect. I cut it up quite a bit to get it to this point but I’m so happy with it.  Now the question is: jewels?

You can see more photos of this and my previous work, as well as hilarious “behind the scenes” of me being a goober at my Facebook fanpage: Adaria Designs Cosplay Commissions!
Gyarados WIP Get your trim on! Found some old gold trim in Jenny’s trim bin! It’s absolutely perfect. I cut it up quite a bit to get it to this point but I’m so happy with it.  Now the question is: jewels?

You can see more photos of this and my previous work, as well as hilarious “behind the scenes” of me being a goober at my Facebook fanpage: Adaria Designs Cosplay Commissions!
Gyarados WIP Get your trim on! Found some old gold trim in Jenny’s trim bin! It’s absolutely perfect. I cut it up quite a bit to get it to this point but I’m so happy with it.  Now the question is: jewels?

You can see more photos of this and my previous work, as well as hilarious “behind the scenes” of me being a goober at my Facebook fanpage: Adaria Designs Cosplay Commissions!
Gyarados WIP Get your trim on! Found some old gold trim in Jenny’s trim bin! It’s absolutely perfect. I cut it up quite a bit to get it to this point but I’m so happy with it.  Now the question is: jewels?

You can see more photos of this and my previous work, as well as hilarious “behind the scenes” of me being a goober at my Facebook fanpage: Adaria Designs Cosplay Commissions!
Gyarados WIP Get your trim on! Found some old gold trim in Jenny’s trim bin! It’s absolutely perfect. I cut it up quite a bit to get it to this point but I’m so happy with it.  Now the question is: jewels?

You can see more photos of this and my previous work, as well as hilarious “behind the scenes” of me being a goober at my Facebook fanpage: Adaria Designs Cosplay Commissions!
+
Gyarados WIP bodice construction
Gyarados WIP bodice construction
Gyarados WIP bodice construction
Gyarados WIP bodice construction
Gyarados WIP bodice construction
+
Gyarados Ginjika in progress Pattern
Gyarados Ginjika in progress Pattern
Gyarados Ginjika in progress Pattern
Gyarados Ginjika in progress Pattern
+
+
So, I’ve wanted to do some kind of tutorial for a while, but I have no secret or tip that isn’t already well displayed out there on beautiful websites or through other cosplay blogs like cosplay-tips and beyond. So….I’m just going to talk, I feel chatty and I haven’t done much interacting with the populace of tumblr. Not sure if this will even be read, but I will write it~

Lets Talk About Fabric Selection 
For me choosing a fabric isn’t only about choosing what is most accurate to the design, especially when the design doesn’t technically exist in a real world. Choosing a fabric is also about what evokes emotion, style, and theme. The above image is a shot of my fabrics on their bolt for my Gyarados ginjika (art & design by Cowslip!). I could have simply chosen a flat, solid colored satin or silk and been on my way. They certainly had plenty to choose from in terms of colors and textures. As you can see in the image, none of the fabrics I chose are basic or plain in their weave, not even the white despite how hard it is to see.
I love texture. I love something with dimension and pop. Given the chance, I will use this method on a costume for a client to add a little extra oomph in the details. It’s that little extra that goes a long way. Usually, however, the costumes I craft don’t have much room to allow for such a detail or they already have a texture designed into it.
I decided to go with a brocade for the body of Gyarados because I felt the idea of a brocade to be fitting toward the Asian style of the character and design Cowslip created. While this design is not a match for that on the bodice, and there’s obviously no design like on the above fabric on the tail, that’s what I think makes a difference, and when it comes together it’s going to look very, very cool. Whether I paint the bodice as in Cowslip’s design, I have not yet decided. I do not want it to be too busy, and so I will probably do a test of a 1’ square section to see if I think the design drawn on the ginjika will work with my personal tastes in fabric. I hope it does. I am a stickler for those kinds of details, but I’m also happy to trade out and spend my time on other minute moments in a garment.
I think I’m very romantic when it comes to my work and my costume choices. I haven’t done much costume design since graduating, but as I said above, given the chance I will take that extra leap. The flow of colors in the image above seems very genuine and proper to my eye, and the textures are what I think could be considered romantic in the way I’m using them. If you’ve watched (or read!) Pokemon you probably know that Gyarados is something of a BAMF and it doesn’t take lip from anyone. When I saw Cowslip’s design I was very pleased. It wasn’t monstrous. It wasn’t over sized or gaudy. It wasn’t dark, big, clunky, or masculine. I’ve always kind of thought Gyarados (and Majikarp) were very masculine in their own right, just by the nature of their design.
Gyarados is a sea monster, after all.
So seeing such a feminine, flowing, fashionable design really stuck to me. I’ve been waiting on this for months, ruminating on cost and production process and whether I should do it in the first place. I know I can, I have no doubt about that, but should I. Should I take the leap?
I jumped. I spent about an hour in the fabric store hemming and hawing over a basic satin or a brocade. I chose brocade. I bit my lip and tapped my foot and paced while debating over a basic satin or a sheer with glitter dots. I chose the sheer. The white did not take much convincing. You can’t see the texture well but it has a slight rib or crinkle to it, which I think will move very nicely with the overall structure of the “belly” down the skirt of the costume. Finally, on the way by I saw this weird…..awkward……strangely melted together synthetic mesh and I thought, “that’s my collar.” It will overlay to the white, which will be hand dyed to fade between pink/collar/ and white at the very lip. It has a stiffness and strength for the shape I need while still being fun and flirty. I’m debating using it on the small ‘windows’ down the skirt, but I have yet to decide.
There’s a lot of fabric out there, lots of choices, but unfortunately I don’t really live in a place where I can go out and touch all the really fun pieces. Most of the fabric I purchase is from Hancock Fabrics or Jo-Ann Fabrics. About two hours away is Mary Jo’s Cloth, which is the NC Mecca for fabrics, in my opinion. They’re also very pricey and I was looking to make this costume out of materials I already had or could purchase relatively cheaply.
Jo-Ann’s with a 40% off coupon and competitors coupon of 15%? PFT Not missing that deal. All in all the above totaled with thread to about $70 or $80, which is bogus and cheap considering at full price it was of course going to be twice that. Sometimes, I feel like I’ve robbed these stores. They just give things away with their coupons when presented to a savvy shopper.
I encourage you all to go out and be creative, take a risk and an extra step and try something new. A lot of times I hear from other cosplayers or my clients when I suggest such a thing, like brocade or embossed suede “wow I never even thought of that!” and I want to push people to think of it. Being creative is about trying new things, making new ideas about old things, and going that last mile to make something truly your own. This is what I do. This is how I make it my own.
<3 ~Adaria
+
Gyarados Ginjika WIP
Today marks a beautiful day for me! For the first time in three years I have finally taken on a personal project that isn’t a coat, or a skirt, and will see itself to completion. I haven’t cosplayed for myself in so long, and then before that only once a year if I were lucky, because my focus was always on school while in college, on my education and the friends I met and have kept. I only finished a costume during my four years because I petitioned to make a class known as “Anime Costume Technology,” which essentially was 10 of us making cosplay under the guidance of our costume design professor, Ami Shupe.
So, here it is. I unveil to you the Pokemon Ginjika design by Cowslip, and my costume part breakdown! The breakdowns are chopped off on the side and bottom, yes, and you don’t actually get to see the cool part, but I did not realize my scanner butchered it all. So, this is what you get. A friend of mine joked “well at least they can’t steal all of your ideas!” I don’t care. Go forth and craft and learn if you can read my handwriting, do so! Rise to your own challenge, be simply magnificent!
Edit: Rise to the challenge anyway, but I uploaded new photos that cover all my sketching!
Anyway~ This is a monster of a project and I am hopeful to debut at Ichibancon in January. It will likely be the only costume I craft for myself (other than for Bronycon) for a while and so it will go with me everywhere: Animazement, Triad Anime, Hoshicon, and more! I don’t know where my life will lead me next year. I have a new job, a new outlook on life after separating with my beau of four years, and I’m finally finding me again. This costume will be my greatest challenge, and my greatest work. It will combine techniques I’ve already used and have mastered as well as utilize those others have mastered and crafted tutorials for. I will be dyeing the fabric to get the gradients, crafting resin molds for the crown and belt around the bust, and the tail will be articulating, which means it will be stuffed full with foam to hold it’s shape but can in fact move and pose—though it could it stand up on it’s own.
Save for the wig base and perhaps the fan, nothing on this costume will be pre-made.
What an incredible and incredibly daunting task! I can’t wait!
Gyarados Ginjika WIP
Today marks a beautiful day for me! For the first time in three years I have finally taken on a personal project that isn’t a coat, or a skirt, and will see itself to completion. I haven’t cosplayed for myself in so long, and then before that only once a year if I were lucky, because my focus was always on school while in college, on my education and the friends I met and have kept. I only finished a costume during my four years because I petitioned to make a class known as “Anime Costume Technology,” which essentially was 10 of us making cosplay under the guidance of our costume design professor, Ami Shupe.
So, here it is. I unveil to you the Pokemon Ginjika design by Cowslip, and my costume part breakdown! The breakdowns are chopped off on the side and bottom, yes, and you don’t actually get to see the cool part, but I did not realize my scanner butchered it all. So, this is what you get. A friend of mine joked “well at least they can’t steal all of your ideas!” I don’t care. Go forth and craft and learn if you can read my handwriting, do so! Rise to your own challenge, be simply magnificent!
Edit: Rise to the challenge anyway, but I uploaded new photos that cover all my sketching!
Anyway~ This is a monster of a project and I am hopeful to debut at Ichibancon in January. It will likely be the only costume I craft for myself (other than for Bronycon) for a while and so it will go with me everywhere: Animazement, Triad Anime, Hoshicon, and more! I don’t know where my life will lead me next year. I have a new job, a new outlook on life after separating with my beau of four years, and I’m finally finding me again. This costume will be my greatest challenge, and my greatest work. It will combine techniques I’ve already used and have mastered as well as utilize those others have mastered and crafted tutorials for. I will be dyeing the fabric to get the gradients, crafting resin molds for the crown and belt around the bust, and the tail will be articulating, which means it will be stuffed full with foam to hold it’s shape but can in fact move and pose—though it could it stand up on it’s own.
Save for the wig base and perhaps the fan, nothing on this costume will be pre-made.
What an incredible and incredibly daunting task! I can’t wait!
Gyarados Ginjika WIP
Today marks a beautiful day for me! For the first time in three years I have finally taken on a personal project that isn’t a coat, or a skirt, and will see itself to completion. I haven’t cosplayed for myself in so long, and then before that only once a year if I were lucky, because my focus was always on school while in college, on my education and the friends I met and have kept. I only finished a costume during my four years because I petitioned to make a class known as “Anime Costume Technology,” which essentially was 10 of us making cosplay under the guidance of our costume design professor, Ami Shupe.
So, here it is. I unveil to you the Pokemon Ginjika design by Cowslip, and my costume part breakdown! The breakdowns are chopped off on the side and bottom, yes, and you don’t actually get to see the cool part, but I did not realize my scanner butchered it all. So, this is what you get. A friend of mine joked “well at least they can’t steal all of your ideas!” I don’t care. Go forth and craft and learn if you can read my handwriting, do so! Rise to your own challenge, be simply magnificent!
Edit: Rise to the challenge anyway, but I uploaded new photos that cover all my sketching!
Anyway~ This is a monster of a project and I am hopeful to debut at Ichibancon in January. It will likely be the only costume I craft for myself (other than for Bronycon) for a while and so it will go with me everywhere: Animazement, Triad Anime, Hoshicon, and more! I don’t know where my life will lead me next year. I have a new job, a new outlook on life after separating with my beau of four years, and I’m finally finding me again. This costume will be my greatest challenge, and my greatest work. It will combine techniques I’ve already used and have mastered as well as utilize those others have mastered and crafted tutorials for. I will be dyeing the fabric to get the gradients, crafting resin molds for the crown and belt around the bust, and the tail will be articulating, which means it will be stuffed full with foam to hold it’s shape but can in fact move and pose—though it could it stand up on it’s own.
Save for the wig base and perhaps the fan, nothing on this costume will be pre-made.
What an incredible and incredibly daunting task! I can’t wait!
+
Stitch in the ditch? Pin that sucker! It’s ok! Just remember to remove the pins and not run over them!
I’m ready!
+
michello454:

https://www.etsy.com/shop/Michello454?ref=l2-shopheader-name
#Etsy #chainmaille #jewelry

Hey Everyone
I have a fantastic friend who is now available to sell chainmail commission bracelets, earrings, necklaces, and more! You should check out her Etsy shop listed above, and totally follow her BRAND NEW TUMBLR because she is just a great lady with such talent! Check out her stuff today!!
michello454
michello454:

https://www.etsy.com/shop/Michello454?ref=l2-shopheader-name
#Etsy #chainmaille #jewelry

Hey Everyone
I have a fantastic friend who is now available to sell chainmail commission bracelets, earrings, necklaces, and more! You should check out her Etsy shop listed above, and totally follow her BRAND NEW TUMBLR because she is just a great lady with such talent! Check out her stuff today!!
michello454
michello454:

https://www.etsy.com/shop/Michello454?ref=l2-shopheader-name
#Etsy #chainmaille #jewelry

Hey Everyone
I have a fantastic friend who is now available to sell chainmail commission bracelets, earrings, necklaces, and more! You should check out her Etsy shop listed above, and totally follow her BRAND NEW TUMBLR because she is just a great lady with such talent! Check out her stuff today!!
michello454
michello454:

https://www.etsy.com/shop/Michello454?ref=l2-shopheader-name
#Etsy #chainmaille #jewelry

Hey Everyone
I have a fantastic friend who is now available to sell chainmail commission bracelets, earrings, necklaces, and more! You should check out her Etsy shop listed above, and totally follow her BRAND NEW TUMBLR because she is just a great lady with such talent! Check out her stuff today!!
michello454
michello454:

https://www.etsy.com/shop/Michello454?ref=l2-shopheader-name
#Etsy #chainmaille #jewelry

Hey Everyone
I have a fantastic friend who is now available to sell chainmail commission bracelets, earrings, necklaces, and more! You should check out her Etsy shop listed above, and totally follow her BRAND NEW TUMBLR because she is just a great lady with such talent! Check out her stuff today!!
michello454
michello454:

https://www.etsy.com/shop/Michello454?ref=l2-shopheader-name
#Etsy #chainmaille #jewelry

Hey Everyone
I have a fantastic friend who is now available to sell chainmail commission bracelets, earrings, necklaces, and more! You should check out her Etsy shop listed above, and totally follow her BRAND NEW TUMBLR because she is just a great lady with such talent! Check out her stuff today!!
michello454
michello454:

https://www.etsy.com/shop/Michello454?ref=l2-shopheader-name
#Etsy #chainmaille #jewelry

Hey Everyone
I have a fantastic friend who is now available to sell chainmail commission bracelets, earrings, necklaces, and more! You should check out her Etsy shop listed above, and totally follow her BRAND NEW TUMBLR because she is just a great lady with such talent! Check out her stuff today!!
michello454
michello454:

https://www.etsy.com/shop/Michello454?ref=l2-shopheader-name
#Etsy #chainmaille #jewelry

Hey Everyone
I have a fantastic friend who is now available to sell chainmail commission bracelets, earrings, necklaces, and more! You should check out her Etsy shop listed above, and totally follow her BRAND NEW TUMBLR because she is just a great lady with such talent! Check out her stuff today!!
michello454
michello454:

https://www.etsy.com/shop/Michello454?ref=l2-shopheader-name
#Etsy #chainmaille #jewelry

Hey Everyone
I have a fantastic friend who is now available to sell chainmail commission bracelets, earrings, necklaces, and more! You should check out her Etsy shop listed above, and totally follow her BRAND NEW TUMBLR because she is just a great lady with such talent! Check out her stuff today!!
michello454